New Parliament Building phase 2: Indian culture and traditions

Even though the concept and proposal are ready, the execution could yet take another year. Along with artwork to embellish the dining halls, the following phase will also contain around eight new galleries that will be evenly distributed between the Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha Foyers.

Only a little more than a month after it was dedicated, plans are already underway for the second stage of the art project, which will concentrate on the liberation movement and Indian customs. The new Parliament building currently holds a sizable collection of over 5,000 artworks.

Even though the concept and proposal are ready, the execution could yet take another year. Around eight more galleries will be added during the following phase, evenly distributed between the Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha Foyers.

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In addition to another exhibit focusing on the freedom struggle (1857 to 1947), Sachchidanand Joshi, Member-Secretary of the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA), said that a gallery honouring India’s “fight for esteem, pre-1857” will be built on the top ground floor of the Lok Sabha Foyer. The project will be carried out by the IGNCA under the Ministry of Culture’s supervision.

Two galleries will also be located on the first floor; one will focus on the contribution of women to the nation’s advancement, while the other will highlight the contribution of tribal leaders to the freedom effort.

The Rajya Sabha Foyer will contain two new galleries on the first floor (on the Indian connection with environment and traditional sports) and two on the upper ground level (on India’s wisdom and Bhakti traditions).

Joshi stated that the job was allocated to them in February 2022 and that they had less than a year to complete the first phase of the artwork, which was far more elaborate. According to the instructions he gave them, “the basic idea was to keep Indian ethos in mind, and showcase Bharat and bharatiyata.”

Additionally, they had to make sure that all of India’s states and regions had adequate representation. For instance, according to Joshi, 75 female artists from 28 different states and eight UTs created crafts for the Jan Janani Janmabhoomi mural in the Central Foyer. A other gallery, Shilp Deergha, featured more than 250 handcrafted items made by 400 different artists across the nation.