How is wool obtained?: From shearing to scouring

After shearing, the quality of the fleeces is assessed using a method called wool classing, in which a skilled individual known as a wool classer groups wools of similar grading together.

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An animal’s follicles create wool. Follicles, which are tiny skin cells, are found in the epidermis, the top layer of the skin. The wool fibres expand as they move deeper into the dermis, the second skin layer. But unlike hair or fur, wool has a number of characteristics that set it apart. Hair has little to no scale, no crimp, and minimal ability to bind into yarn. Wool is crimped and stretchy. Kemp is the name for the hairy portion of a sheep’s fleece.

To dive in further and to know how wool is actually made, read this article.

How is wool obtained?

Shearing is the procedure in which a shearer removes a sheep’s woollen fleece. After shearing, the quality of the fleeces is assessed using a method called wool classing, in which a skilled individual is known as a wool classer groups wools of similar grading together to maximise the return for the farmer or sheep owner.
“Raw wool” or “greasy wool,” which is the wool that has just been sheared from a sheep, is referred to as having a high concentration of valuable lanolin as well as the sheep’s dead skin and perspiration residue. In order to use the wool for commercial purposes, it must first be scoured because it also contains material from the animal’s habitat. The following step is to scrub or scour. It is a cleaning procedure for oily wool.