Microsoft to allow more control to developers in its App store

Microsoft on Thursday said that it would give developers more control in its app store, providing a sharp contrast to Apple, which is facing growing pressure on its App Store.

Microsoft on Thursday said that it would give developers more control in its app store, providing a sharp contrast to Apple, which is facing growing pressure on its App Store.

Apple is at the center of the debate over app marketplaces because it forces developers to distribute their apps on iPhones and iPads through its hugely lucrative App Store and then takes a 30 percent cut of many of those apps’ sales. Epic Games, maker of Fortnite, has accused Apple in an antitrust lawsuit of abusing its market share to overcharge app developers.

“The App Store has enabled new markets, new services and new products that were unimaginable a dozen years ago, and developers have been primary beneficiaries of this ecosystem,” Apple said.

Microsoft said it was adopting 10 principles for its Microsoft Store, that customers can use to install programs on Windows 10, the computer operating system (OS). The guidelines include giving developers the ability to sell different services on their apps and their websites, allowing users and developers to have access to third-party app stores.

The principles aim “to promote choice, ensure fairness and promote innovation,” Rima Alaily, deputy general counsel at Microsoft, stated. “As an app developer, we have been frustrated at times by other app stores that require us to sell services in our apps even when our users don’t expect or want them, and we cannot do so profitably.”

Microsoft’s application store is not the only way, customers get new programs on a computer. Many users download them directly from a developer’s website like the game streaming platform, Steam.

Microsoft said its principles would not apply to its Xbox gaming console. It said that gaming consoles were sold with little or no profit, and that it instead recouped the development costs through the games.

 

Source: The New York Times