The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences honours David Card, Joshua Angrist & Guido Imbens with Nobel Prize 2021 in Economics

The prize will be shared between the three economists, one half to David Card and the other half together to Joshua D Angrist and Guido W Imbens, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced in Stockholm.

On Monday, the Nobel Prize 2021 in Economic Sciences was awarded to three Economists who worked using natural experiments. The prize will be shared between the three economists, one half to David Card and the other half together to Joshua D Angrist and Guido W Imbens, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced in Stockholm.

At the University of California, Berkeley, Card was awarded half of the prize for interpreting “the labour market effects of minimum wages, immigration and education”. Angrist and Imbens got the other half of the award for “demonstrating how precise conclusions about cause and effect can be drawn from natural experiments”.

The award wraps up a week of Nobel Prizes and is technically known as the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. Since its founding in 1969, it has been granted 52 times and is generally regarded as one of the Nobel prizes.

Last year’s economics prize was awarded to two American economics from Stanford University, Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson, who discovered making auctions work more smoothly.

Last week, five Nobel Prizes were awarded, including the Nobel Peace Prize given on Friday to two journalists, Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov, who produced autonomous news fighting for freedom of expression in the Philippines and Russia.

On Monday, The Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine was awarded to David Julius and Ardem Patapoutia for findings on how humans sense heat, cold and touch. On Tuesday, Three scientists, Syukuro Manabe, Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi, were given the prize in Physics for contributing to our “understanding of complex systems”.

On Wednesday, German chemist Benjamin List and UK-born David MacMillan were awarded the prize in chemistry for discovering asymmetric organocatalysis, which helped make “chemistry greener.”

On Thursday, the Nobel Prize in Literature was given to novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah “for his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents.”

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