Mutinous soldiers in the West African nation of Guinea detain President Alpha Conde

The presidential palace in the capital after hours of heavy gunfire rang out, then announced on state television that the government had been dissolved in an apparent coup d’etat.

On Sunday near the presidential palace in the capital after hours of heavy gunfire rang out, then announced on state television that the government had been dissolved in an apparent coup d’etat. President Alpha Conde was stopped by the Mutinous soldiers in the West African nation of Guinea.

In the announcement, the country’s borders were closed and its constitution was declared invalid, on state television by Army Col. Mamadi Doumbouya, “The duty of a soldier is to save the country. We will no longer entrust politics to one man. We will entrust it to the people,” said Army Col. Mamadi Guineans.

How much support Doumbouya had within the military or other soldiers loyal to the President was not known immediately, to wrest back the control more than a decade might attempt. On Monday plans to replace Guinea’s Government were later announced by the junta with regional commanders at an event and warned by saying “Any refusal to appear will be considered rebellion” against the country’s new military leaders.

Warning against violence in Guinea has been given by the U.S. State Department and urged to avoid “extra-constitutional” actions that “will only erode Guinea’s prospects for peace, stability, and prosperity.”

“Actions could limit the ability of the United States and Guinea’s other international partners to support the country,” added spokesman Ned Price in a statement.

Until a video emerged showing the 83-year-old leader tired and disheveled military custody,  Conde’s had been unknown for hours after the intense fighting Sunday in downtown Conakry.

As per reports, Political instability has been marked in Guinea for long history. After the first post-independence leader died control of the country was taken over by Lansana Conte who remained in power for a quarter-century until his death in 2008.

Putting army Capt. Moussa “Dadis” Camara in charge of the second coup of the country followed soon. At the time of his rule, the security forces were opened fire on demonstrators at a stadium in Conakry who were protesting his plans to run for president. More than 150 people were killed and at least 100 women were raped, said human rights groups. Camara later went into exile after surviving an assassination attempt, and a transitional government organized the landmark 2010 election won by Conde.

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