Ex-US President Barack Obama urges World leaders for immediate action on climate change

Obama’s presence on the sidelines of the conventions is meant to suggest governments of the joy that encompassed the striking of the Paris agreement and advise them to more urgent, vital steps to put the 2015 agreement into effect.

On Monday, Barack Obama is displaying confidence at UN climate talks that the Biden administration will eventually receive its $555 billion climate case through Congress and criticising US opponents China and Russia for what he terms “dangerous absence of urgency” in cutting their climate-wrecking emissions.

The UN climate convention in Glasgow, Scotland, is the Ex-US president’s first since he assisted in performing the conquest of the 2015 Paris climate accord when nations pledged to decrease fossil fuel and farming emissions quickly to retain the Earth’s warming under hazardous levels.

Climate summits have been less conclusive since then, significantly as former President Donald Trump withdrew from the Paris agreement. President Joe Biden has since joined back.

Obama’s presence on the sidelines of the conventions is meant to suggest governments of the joy that encompassed the striking of the Paris agreement and advise them to more urgent, vital steps to put the 2015 agreement into effect.

In prepared remarks taken by The Associated Press ahead of a speech to activists, Obama remarked attempts by the United States, the world’s second-worst climate polluter after China, delayed when Trump withdrew from the climate accord.

Despite resistance within Biden’s party that has hindered the climate-fighting enactment, Obama said he was convinced that some variant of Biden’s driven climate bill would pass in Congress in the weeks to come. “It will set the United States on course to meet its new climate targets,” he said.

And while in 2015, the agreement between Obama administration negotiators and their Chinese equivalents was seen as paving the way to the global Paris accord. On Monday, Obama reprimanded Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin for not meeting other global leaders at the climate talks in Glasgow.

“It was particularly discouraging to see the leaders of two of the world’s largest emitters, China and Russia, decline even to attend the proceedings, and their national plans reflect what appears to be a dangerous absence of urgency,” Obama remarked.

Obama talked earlier on Monday to a gathering on Pacific Island nations, including ones whose survival is endangered by rising ocean temperatures under climate change. “All of us have a part to play. All of us have work to do. All of us have sacrifices to make” on climate, he said.

“But those of us who live in wealthy nations, those of us who helped to precipitate the problem” of global warming, “we have an added burden,” Obama said.

Scientists say the seriousness of global warming is as great as the desperate speeches at Glasgow have communicated, with the planet only a few years away from the time where reaching the goals set in the Paris agreement becomes unlikely due to mounting damage from coal, petroleum, agriculture and other pollution sources.

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