What is Breton Stripe?: The history

Breton stripes are a timeless classic that is most frequently seen on short- and long-sleeved cotton t-shirts.

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Based on the classic French sailor top, Breton stripes are made up of narrow blue horizontal stripes on a white background. They were popularised by Coco Chanel in the 1930s. Read more to find out its history as well.

Breton Stripe

Breton stripes are a timeless classic that is most frequently seen on short- and long-sleeved cotton t-shirts. They are horizontal, blue and white, and one of the simplest patterns to wear.
Since they were deemed simple to identify in an emergency at sea, thick cotton shirts with these stripes became a mandatory part of the uniform for seamen in 1858. Moreover, due to the fabric’s durability.
A Breton-striped top is a pretty lovely substitute for a simple sweatshirt and given their maritime heritage, they go great when travelling. It is important to take into account their optical effect, which can make you appear broader and is advantageous to guys with narrow chests or thin shoulders.

History of Breton Stripe

All French navy sailors in Northern France were required to wear the Breton stripe shirt starting in 1858, and the original version had 21 stripes. The 21 stripes represented the victories of Napoleon Bonaparte.
The uniform for the French navy was first worn in this fashion in 1858. The laid-back style assisted in departing from the period’s tightly corseted clothing. Additionally, it led to a permanent change in the appearance of casual womenswear.
The Breton striped shirt is essential in terms of essentials, and although styling options have changed throughout time—whether worn by famous people, movie stars, or contemporary It girls—its impression has remarkably kept the same.