How are High Heels dangerous for your health?

High-heeled footwear can result in a wide range of foot issues and even structural changes to the foot, which may need surgical treatment.

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One runs a higher risk of stumbling over their toes or tripping over something while they are barefoot and it is important to wear footwear. Most times, many people prefer to wear their high heels over other types of footwear because they adore the way they look and feel. You gain a few inches of height by wearing high heels, which makes you feel more powerful. However, there are several situations in which wearing high heels may be unhealthy or even harmful to your health. Read this article to learn more.

High Heels: Dangerous for your health?

High-heeled footwear can result in a wide range of foot issues and even structural changes to the foot, which can result in ailments including bunions, hammertoes, neuromas, equinus, and others that may need surgical treatment. With your foot in a plantarflexed position due to a high heel, the pressure on your forefoot is increased, which requires you to reposition the rest of your body to maintain balance. Your body’s alignment becomes incorrect as a result, giving you a stiff, unnatural posture.

Additionally, the plantarflexed position of the foot makes it difficult to push off the ground effectively when wearing high heels, and the higher the heels, the more difficult it is to go forward with the body. Additionally, because the hip flexor muscles are situated on the upper front of the thighs, wearing heels forces them into a constantly flexed position, and repeated use of these muscles over time can shorten and contract them, flattening the lumbar spine over time and contributing to hip and low back pain.

High heels also allow the medial (inner) knee, which is a common site for osteoarthritis, to be compressed and rotated with an excessive amount of stress.
Not only that but placing the foot in a downward posture will put a lot of pressure on the plantar (bottom) part of the forefoot. Over time, this can cause discomfort in the foot arch, a disease known as plantar fasciitis.