Imran Khan explains his vision for future international relations with India, which he knows better than any other Pakistani

Imran Khan spoke at length on the type of foreign relationship he expects between Pakistan and the United States once the troop pullout from Afghanistan is completed.

In an interview with the New York Times, Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan claimed that he understands India better than all other Pakistanis and that the country has shown him “love and respect” because of their mutual passion of cricket. You know, out of all the Pakistanis, I probably know India better than the rest. Because cricket is such a popular sport in India, I have received more love and respect than anyone else. In both countries, it’s nearly religious, the great former cricketer observed.

He expressed dissatisfaction that despite reaching out after taking office, he was unable to normalise commercial relations with India, stating that a “civilised business relationship” would be advantageous to both countries.

So, when I came into power, the first thing I did was approach Prime Minister Modi and say, ‘Look, my primary priority in coming to power is to alleviate poverty in Pakistan.’ And the best way of doing this would be for India and Pakistan to have a regular, civilised business relationship. Khan stated that it would be beneficial to both countries.

I believe it is the RSS’s particular ideology, to which Narendra Modi belongs, that has run into a brick block. As a result, the answer to your query is affirmative. I believe we would have had an excellent relationship with another Indian leadership if there had been one. And, absolutely, we would have worked out all of our issues through dialogue, he added.

Khan also spoke at length about the type of foreign relationship he expects Pakistan having with the US once the troop withdrawal process in Afghanistan is completed, comparing it to the relationship the US has with the United Kingdom and India. Which would be more “fair” than the one shared by both countries throughout the “war on terror.”

Khan also spoke at length about the type of foreign relationship he expects Pakistan having with the US once the troop withdrawal process in Afghanistan is completed, comparing it to the relationship the US has with the United Kingdom and India. Which would be more “fair” than the one shared by both countries throughout the “war on terror.”

Khan expressed doubts about the type of military connection the two countries would have when the US pulls out of Afghanistan. I’m not sure what kind of military partnership will exist when the US leaves. But, for the time being, the relationship should be built on the shared goal of finding a political settlement in Afghanistan before the US leaves, he stated.

When asked if Pakistan would accept a Taliban-led government in Afghanistan, Khan said that Pakistan will only recognise a government chosen by the Afghan people, regardless of whatever government they pick.

While giving his full support to the Afghan government led by President Ashraf Ghani, he stated that Pakistan will not take “military action” against the Taliban, and that if they try to take over Afghanistan, Pakistan will “close the border, because now we can.” because we can today, because we have gated our border (Durand line), which was before [open], and because Pakistan does not want to be drawn into battle. Second, we do not want another refugee surge.”

Khan argued that the signing of a deal between the US and Afghanistan in Doha on February 29, 2020, allowing US forces to come home, weakened Pakistan’s power over the Taliban since “the moment the US specified a date of leave, Taliban practically claimed victory.” They believe they have won the war. As a result, the more powerful they feel, the less we can affect them.

“I think it’s a tragedy for India,” Khan said in the interview, “because it’ll just mean that this issue festers on and on… and (prevents) any interaction — normal relationship — between Pakistan and India.”

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