Krishna Nitish Bharadwaj from Mahabharat justifies Oppenheimer’s sex scene and the Bhagavad Gita controversy as ‘Natural mechanical act’  

Anurag Thakur, the minister of information and broadcasting, was made aware of the contentious sequence and called for “absolute accountability” from the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC).

Recently, Christopher Nolan’s pet project “Oppenheimer” was released in theatres all over the world. While it has received praise for its cinematic experience and outstanding cast performances, it has also caused a significant uproar in India.

The nation was shocked by a moment in the movie where Cillian Murphy’s character, Oppenheimer, reads words from the Bhagavad Gita while engaging in sexual activity with Florence Pugh’s character.

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Along with joining the chorus, a number of actors and politicians have attacked the film’s producers for allegedly offending the revered Hindu scripture.

However, it appears that Nitish Bharadwaj, an actor best known for portraying Lord Krishna in BR Chopra’s Mahabharata, has a different viewpoint on the entire incident.

Bharadwaj defended the scene from the movie in a recent interview, saying that the lyric should be understood in light of Oppenheimer’s emotional state of mind at the time.

“A scientist thinks of his creation 24x7x365 days, irrespective of what he is doing. His mind space is consumed fully by his creation and the physical act is just a natural mechanical act,” he stated.

He went on to say that when the physicist Oppenheimer created the atomic bomb and saw how it was used in Japan to kill people, he was seen questioning himself if he did his duty properly.

Anurag Thakur, the minister of information and broadcasting, has called for “absolute accountability” from the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) in response to the contentious scene.

He said that such carelessness could not be tolerated and enquired as to how the sequence had been approved for the Censor Board’s final cut.

The incident was described as “an insult to the Bhagavad Gita” and as “an assault on our values and civilisation” by the Union government’s information commissioner, Uday Mahurkar.