Tesla’s autopilot technology severely criticised by Consumer Report

Tesla autopilot technology which claims full self-driving capability has been criticised severely by the Consumer Report’s case study.

Tesla autopilot technology which claims full self-driving capability has been criticised severely by the Consumer Report’s case study. It has bashed the technology saying that it is unreliable in that it might not be fully safe for drivers and pedestrians and not worthy of the $8000 price. While Tesla claims that the vehicles can be made capable of driving themselves eventually, as of now it needs attention from a driver, states the Consumer Reports after testing the latest hardware and software of the version 2020.24.6.4

“While these features are designed to become more capable over time, the currently enabled features do not make the vehicle autonomous,” said the company.

Features that can assist the divers with parking, changing lanes on the highway and even coming to a complete stop at red light or traffic signs are some of the claims that Tesla makes on its autopilot technology whose accountability has also been questioned in the report.  “Tesla has repeatedly rolled out crude beta features, some of which can put people’s safety at risk and shouldn’t be used anywhere but on a private test track or proving ground,” says William Wallace, manager of safety policy for Consumer Reports.

“Several of the features don’t provide much in the way of real benefits to customers, despite the extremely high purchase price,” says Jake Fisher, senior director of auto testing at Consumer Reports.

Tesla’s autopilot technology has become the most valued in recent times and founder Elon Musk has claimed that using the Dojo supercomputer Tesla’s autopilot technology will achieve a massive breakthrough.